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Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics related blogs

There has been several attempts to collect a list of blogs related to bioinformatics, computational biology or chemoinformatics.

At nodalpoint such a list is continuosly updated. Abhishek Tiwari also created another list with more programming oriented blogs.

I have merged both lists and added some other blogs I know to create the following one:

aac.translate to N: Read | Subscribe
Bioinfo Blog!: Read | Subscribe
Bioinformática: Read | Subscribe
Biology by other means: Read | Subscribe
Biorelated: Read | Subscribe
biotext.org.uk: Read | Subscribe
Blue Collar Bioinformatics: Read | Subscribe
ChemHack: Read | Subscribe
Daily Life in an Ivory Basement: Read | Subscribe
Dammit Jim!: Read | Subscribe
Fisheye Perspective: Read | Subscribe
Gregor Gorjanc: Read | Subscribe
Inparablog: Read | Subscribe
It’s Not Easy Being Genes: Read | Subscribe
Knowledge beyond words: Read | Subscribe
Mailund on the Internet: Read | Subscribe
Mark Bieda’s Weblog: Read | Subscribe
One R Tip A Day: Read | Subscribe
Pih is All: Read | Subscribe
Programming for Scientists: Read | Subscribe
Saaien Tist: Read | Subscribe
scienceoss.com: Read | Subscribe
So much to do, so little time: Read | Subscribe
Some Stuff: Read | Subscribe
The Third Bit: Read | Subscribe
Academic Productivity: Read | Subscribe
chem-bla-ics: Read | Subscribe
Chris Miller’s Blog: Read | Subscribe
genomeboy.com: Read | Subscribe
iPhylo: Read | Subscribe
Journalology: Read | Subscribe
Keet blog: Read | Subscribe
T. taxus: Read | Subscribe
Beginning Python for Bioinformatics: Read | Subscribe
bio.struct: Read | Subscribe
Bio::Blogs: Read | Subscribe
Bioinformatics Zen: Read | Subscribe
Bleeding Edge Biotech: Read | Subscribe
Blogging the biotechnology revolution: Read | Subscribe
business|bytes|genes|molecules: Read | Subscribe
Chinacat Blog: Read | Subscribe
DC’s Improbable Science: Read | Subscribe
Depth-First: Read | Subscribe
eric.jain.name: Read | Subscribe
Flags and Lollipops – Bioinformatics Blog: Read | Subscribe
Fourth Floor Studio: Read | Subscribe
Freelancing science: Read | Subscribe
HubLog: Read | Subscribe
I was lost but now I live here: Read | Subscribe
Nascent: Read | Subscribe
Omics! Omics!: Read | Subscribe
Open Reading Frame: Read | Subscribe
Open.nfo: Read | Subscribe
O’Really?: Read | Subscribe
Paras Chopra’s Blog: Read | Subscribe
peanutbutter: Read | Subscribe
Perfect Storm: Read | Subscribe
Public Rambling: Read | Subscribe
RRResearch: Read | Subscribe
Science in the open: Read | Subscribe
Suicyte Notes: Read | Subscribe
Synthesis: Read | Subscribe
The Hyphal Tip: Read | Subscribe
The Mind Wobbles (Systems Biology & Bioinformatics): Read | Subscribe
The Omics world: Read | Subscribe
The Tree of Life: Read | Subscribe
Trapped in the USA: Read | Subscribe
(título desconocido): Read | Subscribe
What You’re Doing Is Rather Desperate: Read | Subscribe
YOKOFAKUN: Read | Subscribe
Your bones got a little machine: Read | Subscribe
beta.Log [ Computational Biology News ]: Read | Subscribe

You can also download this list in OPML format.

Discussion

5 comments for “Bioinformatics related blogs”

  1. Hello Alberto.

    Great job done here…Come read us on “Knowledge beyond words”, a blog about information technologies in the biomedical sector. It is written by the people who have developed novoseek, the new biomedical search engine.

    Hope to hear from you soon,

    Valentin

    Posted by Valentin | March 3, 2009, 1:17 am
  2. Hi,
    you can add the “Macromolecular Modeling Blog” (http://rosettadesigngroup.com/blog/) about anything that has to do with computational structural biology.

    Posted by Nir | March 3, 2009, 7:45 am
  3. Posted by Chris | March 18, 2009, 3:40 pm
  4. Good and u can add molecular biotechnology also.

    Posted by books | May 22, 2009, 1:34 am
  5. ESTs: GENE DISCOVERY MADE EASIER

    Investigators are working diligently to sequence and assemble the genomes of various organisms, including the mouse and human, for a number of important reasons. Although important goals of any sequencing project may be to obtain a genomic sequence and identify a complete set of genes, the ultimate goal is to gain an understanding of when, where, and how a gene is turned on, a process commonly referred to as gene expression. Once we begin to understand where and how a gene is expressed under normal circumstances, we can then study what happens in an altered state, such as in disease. To accomplish the latter goal, however, researchers must identify and study the protein, or proteins, coded for by a gene.

    As one can imagine, finding a gene that codes for a protein, or proteins, is not easy. Traditionally, scientists would start their search by defining a biological problem and developing a strategy for researching the problem. Oftentimes, a search of the scientific literature provided various clues about how to proceed. For example, other laboratories may have published data that established a link between a particular protein and a disease of interest. Researchers would then work to isolate that protein, determine its function, and locate the gene that coded for the protein. Alternatively, scientists could conduct what is referred to as linkage studies to determine the chromosomal location of a particular gene. Once the chromosomal location was determined, scientists would use biochemical methods to isolate the gene and its corresponding protein. Either way, these methods took a great deal of time—years in some cases—and yielded the location and description of only a small percentage of the genes found in the human genome.

    Posted by naturebios.com | September 7, 2009, 11:13 pm

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